Elon Musk suggests turning Twitter SF HQ to homeless shelter since no one shows up anyway

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A series of questionnaires were sent out through Twitter on Saturday by Elon Musk, the company’s new majority shareholder, to his millions of followers on the social media network. After suggesting that the company’s Silicon Valley headquarters be converted into a homeless shelter, the outspoken Tesla CEO, who is renowned for his social media antics, requested that the letter “w” be deleted from Twitter.

When Musk purchased a 9.2 percent stake in Facebook earlier this week and was later appointed to the company’s board of directors, his first post appeared to take aim at the company’s lax remote working policies, claiming that he proposed the plan “because no one shows up anyway.” Musk later clarified that he was referring to the company’s lax remote working policies in a subsequent post. In the short time since its release at 9:30 PM ET, the billionaire businessman’s 24-hour poll has garnered overwhelming support, with 91.1 percent of more than 1,392,428 respondents voting in favor of the projected effort.

Out of 1,193,305 votes cast thus far, Musk’s second tweet on eliminating the letter ‘w’ earned 55.8 percent of ‘yes’ replies and 44.2 percent of ‘of course’ responses, making it the most popular. Twitter officials, who had given staff the option of working from home ‘forever’ while dealing with the epidemic, reopened their offices on March 15, with the option of remote work still available.

When Musk posted the original message, he seemed to be taking aim at the company’s permissive remote working policy, adding that he came up with the scheme ‘since no one comes there anyhow.’ So far, 1,392,429 respondents have voted in favor of the proposal, or 91.1 percent of the total.

Musk’s second tweet regarding eliminating the letter ‘w’ saw him provide two alternatives without offering a negative response, with 55.8 percent saying ‘yes’ and 44.2 percent saying ‘of course’ out of 1,193,305 votes received thus far. After over two years of closure of our offices and travel, I am thrilled to say that we are now ready to reopen all of our offices across the globe, including those in the United States. Twitter CEO Parag Agrawal stated this in a memo to employees that was released on Twitter on March 3.

In addition, the executive said that “business travel will resume immediately” and that “office openings will begin on March 15.” Employees may work remotely ‘forever’ if they wanted to, according to a policy set in place by previous CEO Jack Dorsey during the early days of the service, which Agrawal said he will follow. Agrawal was named CEO of the San Francisco-based company in November.

Our first focus has been to keep you all safe from the beginning of the epidemic, and it will be our top priority in the future,’ Agrawal said. In the meanwhile, you’ll be going about your business, adapting to local health regulations, and selecting what works best for you.

“As a result, you should be able to make judgments about where you work, whether you feel secure traveling for business, and which events you want to attend,” the CEO said in a strong statement. ‘Even when we reopen, our strategy will stay the same,’ Agrawal, 37, continued to say. According to the CEO, in another bolded remark, ‘Wherever you feel most productive and creative is where you will work, and that includes working from home full-time forever.’

‘Do you go to the office every day? That is also effective. How about some days at the office and other days at home? Without a doubt.’ Agrawal, on the other hand, cautioned that as a consequence of the new policy, ‘distributed working would be much, much more difficult’ and that ‘there will be plenty of obstacles to contend with.

According to Agrawal, there are several advantages to having workers in the same physical location so that they can get acquainted with the ‘business culture,’ and that trips to the workplace would ‘bring that culture to life in such a compelling manner.’ The CEO then offered a final statement that looked to be hopeful about the desire of employees to return to traditional in-person work. the workplace or possibly at an event in your or mine hometown? ‘I am looking forward to seeing you all back at work.”

‘I just can’t wait… Parag.’ It seems that the CEO’s confidence in employees’ willingness to come to work in person was misplaced more than a month later, as Covid-19 cases continue to plummet. This appears to be something that new board member Musk wanted to zero in on with his blatantly sarcastic statement. Google, for example, announced to workers last month that the company will begin requiring employees to return in person at least three days each week, a policy that went into force this past week and is expected to continue.

Apple, on the other hand, has announced that starting April 11, workers would be expected to work from the office at least one day every week. Twitter, on the other hand, has not instituted any in-person obligations for its employees — a choice that Musk seems to criticize in his article. Musk advocated various modifications to Twitter’s business structures in a series of tweets before starting the poll, including decreasing the price of the company’s premium Blue service, barring advertisements on the network, and letting users make payments using cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin.

A subscription to the service, which includes additional features such as an undo button and ad-free news articles, is now available for $2.99 per month.

On Saturday, Musk said, ‘Price should probably be $2/month, but paid 12 months up advance & account doesn’t receive checkmark for 60 days (watch for credit card chargebacks) & terminated with no refund if used for scam/spam,’ ‘And there will be no advertisements,’ the South African business magnate remarked. ‘If Twitter is dependent on advertising revenue in order to exist, the ability of businesses to influence policy is dramatically increased.’ Furthermore, Musk said that ‘everyone who joins up for Twitter Blue (which costs $3/month) should get an authentication checkmark.’

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